Categories:  'Education as an Economic Issue'  

With Lower Standards And Few Jobs for Graduates, Are Law Schools A Scam?

Law schools lure in students who borrow to pay for a professional education, but after graduation, the jobs they've borrowed to attain do not exist. [...]

Law schools lure in students who borrow to pay for a professional education, but after graduation, the jobs they’ve borrowed to attain do not exist.

“About 20 percent of law graduates from 2010 are working at jobs that do not require a law license … and only 40 percent are working in law firms, compared with 60 percent from the class a decade earlier.”

While much of the economy has recovered since the 2008 financial collapse and recession, the job market for law graduates has yet to bounce back. Unlike graduating classes of law students from earlier recessions, the class of 2010 has not seen their job opportunities improve in the years since they graduated.

According to recent studies, “more than 80 percent of law school graduates [have] substantial student debt,” but the lack of good-paying law jobs hinders repayment.

Pictured: J W graduated from Columbia Law School in 2010; he is a test-prep tutor now. Credit: James Estrin/The New York Times

Articles

Publication Date: 26/04/2015
Source: The New York Times
Author: Elizabeth Olson