Categories:  'Economic Inequality'   'Health Care - The Effects of Lacking Coverage'   'Racial Inequality'  

Who Are the Uninsured?

In 2014, the first year in which the Affordable Care Act (or Obamacare) was implemented, “33 million Americans, 10.4 percent of the U.S. population, … [...]

In 2014, the first year in which the Affordable Care Act (or Obamacare) was implemented, “33 million Americans, 10.4 percent of the U.S. population, … went without health insurance for the entirety of [the year],” and many more were uninsured for at least part of the year.

The law was not intended to cover every American – undocumented immigrants and immigrants who have been in the US for less than five years aren’t eligible for coverage – but most of those who remained uninsured in 2014 were eligible for coverage under Obamacare. Nearly 5 million of the uninsured were children, and uninsured Americans are “disproportionately poor, black and Hispanic.”

Those who live in states that elected not to expand Medicaid coverage were more likely to be uninsured, whether or not they fell into the so-called Medicaid Gap.

“Medicaid historically tended to cover just families with children, the bulk of those falling into the gap were working-age adults without children; nonetheless, about 800,000 parents with children living at home fell into the gap.”

States that did not expand Medicaid often also used the initially-troubled federal insurance exchange (rather than developing a separate statewide exchange).

Articles

Publication Date: 28/09/2015
Source: FiveThirtyEight
Author: Anna Maria Barry-Jester and Ben Casselman