Categories:  'Education as an Economic Issue'  

The United States has a Dropout Crisis

A college education is one of the best investments a young person can make. A bachelor’s degree means that a person typically earns $800,000 more [...]

A college education is one of the best investments a young person can make. A bachelor’s degree means that a person typically earns $800,000 more than a person with only a high school degree and is key to upward economic mobility. However, the dropout problem is particularly high for students whose parents did not attend college, including many first-generation students. Students without college-educated parents miss out on important advice, support, and anecdotal experience. Helping children get into college isn’t enough – there must be more focus on getting students through graduation.

How do we achieve this? There are personal actions that students can assume themselves, but there are also institutional solutions that better address the roots of the problem. Professional advisors who work with struggling students to coach soft skills encouraged more students to stay in college and graduate. An “on-track Pell bonus” increased the grants of low-income students who enrolled in 15 credits a semester, which is the right level of course work for a student to graduate on time. A program at City University of New York provided intensive advising, a subway pass, textbooks, and money to cover shortfalls between cost and financial aid, all things a college-educated parent typically provides, and doubled their three-year graduation rate.

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Articles

Publication Date: 06/04/2017
Source: The New York Times
Author: Meredith Kolodner
Publication Date: 19/02/2016
Source: The New York Times
Author: Susan Dynarski
Publication Date: 2/19/16
Source: New York Times
Author: Suan Dynarski