Categories:  'Economic Inequality'  

Suppliers In a Sharing Economy Do Not Have the Benefit of Recognized Employment

" If you’re in the taxi or limousine business, Uber and Lyft are your worst nightmare. These companies have emerged almost overnight to become major [...]

If you’re in the taxi or limousine business, Uber and Lyft are your worst nightmare. These companies have emerged almost overnight to become major players who are luring customers away from old habits with a combination of convenience, price, efficiency and even “cool”. Airbnb is similarly taking market share from hotels, motels and inns. While TaskRabbit — really only one of many startups that connect people who need stuff done with the people who can do it for them (do my shopping, write my term paper, clean my garage) —  is happy to change how you go about buying almost any service.

It’s a revolution, for sure, but a decidedly one-sided one so far, driven by demand. What does that mean for all these sharers who are, in large part, working for big companies without ever being deemed employees? For now, they’re an unorganised group of suppliers. But that could change, with disruptive results.

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Articles

Publication Date: 27/12/2016
Source: NPR
Author: Daniel Zwerdling
Publication Date: 26/12/2016
Source: NPR
Author: Daniel Zwerdling
Publication Date: 26/05/2015
Source: BBC
Author: Sydney Finkelstein