Categories:  'Racial Inequality'  

Foreclosures’ Racialized Effects Increase Segregation

During the housing crisis, more than 10 million American families lost their homes to foreclosure, forcing them to move. While foreclosed families tended to stay [...]

During the housing crisis, more than 10 million American families lost their homes to foreclosure, forcing them to move. While foreclosed families tended to stay within the same metropolitan area, migration during the Great Recession reversed earlier integration gains – the “crisis slowed declines in segregation… between blacks and whites by 19 percent, and between whites and Hispanics by 50 percent,” across the country.

A study published in the American Sociological Review suggests an explanation for these disparities. “Minorities who lost their homes moved to more distressed neighborhoods, while white homeowners who could leave appear to have been the first to pull out of places hit by foreclosure.”

While changes in levels of segregation from the housing crisis might seem small, housing segregation is slow-changing and difficult to combat, making the effects of the housing crisis quite significant in context.

 

Image by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Articles

Publication Date: 08/05/2015
Source: The Washington Post
Author: Emily Badger