Categories:  'Economic Inequality'   'Gender Inequality'   'Racial Inequality'  

Employment Discrimination Begins on the Resume

Class, gender, and racial clues on the resumes of job applicants are used to make arbitrary decisions – which have discriminatory effects. Harvard Business School studies [...]

Class, gender, and racial clues on the resumes of job applicants are used to make arbitrary decisions – which have discriminatory effects.

Harvard Business School studies have demonstrated that there is measurable discriminatory effect against (fictional) job applicants whose resumes were designed to demonstrate identical qualifications – the only differences were the applicants’ names (male/female) and their extracurricular activities and awards. Higher-class applicants listed “traditionally upper-class” extracurricular activities such as sailing and polo, while lower-class applicants mentioned participating in sports like track and field and pick-up soccer.

The upper-class man received a call back more than four times as often as any other applicant, and “received more invitations to interview than all other applicants in [the] study combined,” including the upper-class woman, whose resume differed only in name.

Articles

Publication Date: 5/31/17
Source: Harvard Business Review
Author:
Publication Date: 21/12/2016
Source: Harvard Business Review
Author: Lauren Rivera and András Tilcsik