Categories:  'Economic Inequality'   'Education as an Economic Issue'  

Economic inequality in higher education

America's elite colleges present an image of meritocracy, but continue to cater to the wealthiest Americans. A new study, based on millions of anonymous tax records, shows [...]

America’s elite colleges present an image of meritocracy, but continue to cater to the wealthiest Americans.

A new study, based on millions of anonymous tax records, shows that some colleges are even more economically segregated than previously understood, while others are associated with income mobility.

Nearly forty colleges and universities had more students from the top 1 percent of households than from the bottom 60 percent.

The study found that while poor students who attend top colleges do about as well as their rich classmates, “the students at elite colleges, at least as of 2013, were not actually much more economically diverse than in the past.”

In the top 0.1% of American households (the top one-thousandth), 40% of students attend Ivy League schools or other elite colleges – a stark contrast to the bottom 20% of American households, where less than 50% of students attend any college at all, two-year or four-year.

This study demonstrates the stunningly drastic state of economic inequality in American education in general, and at elite American universities in particular – check out the article for data about specific colleges and universities.

Articles

Publication Date: 18/01/2017
Source: The New York Times
Author: Gregor Aisch, Larry Buchanan, Amanda Cox and Kevin Quealy